Indian Reservations

Indian Reservations

Native American land is controlled by tribal law. Tribal Law only applies to those who live on the Reservation. However, if you are carrying a firearm with a concealed firearm permit that is valid in the state the reservation is located in that permit may not be valid on the Reservation. If caught they will most likely take the firearm and tell you that you can go to Tribal Court to get it back. Some Tribes consider federal and state highways through their land as being under their control and say you cannot carry a firearm in a vehicle or on the roads on their Reservation. Tribal Police in most instances works closely with the Local Law Enforcement surrounding the Reservation. If you are breaking a state firearms law they will most likely hold you and contact the local authorities.
We recommend that before you carry a firearm on any Reservation ensure you contact the tribal leader and obtain permission in writing if possible. Otherwise, keep it unloaded and secured in your trunk or locked box in the back of a vehicle that does not have a trunk.

At present, there are 574 federally recognized American Indian and Alaska Native tribes and villages.
Approximately 56.2 million acres are held in trust by the United States for various Indian tribes and individuals. There are approximately 326 Indian land areas in the U.S. administered as federal Indian reservations (i.e., reservations, pueblos, rancherias, missions, villages, communities, etc.). The largest is the 16 million-acre Navajo Nation Reservation located in Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah. The smallest is a 1.32-acre parcel in California where the Pit River Tribe’s cemetery is located. Many of the smaller reservations are less than 1,000 acres.
Because the Constitution vested the Legislative Branch with plenary power over Indian Affairs, states have no authority over tribal governments unless expressly authorized by Congress. While federally recognized tribes generally are not subordinate to states, they can have a government-to-government relationship with these other sovereigns, as well.
Furthermore, federally recognized tribes possess both the right and the authority to regulate activities on their lands independently from state government control. They can enact and enforce stricter or more lenient laws and regulations than those of the surrounding or neighboring state(s) wherein they are located. Yet, tribes frequently collaborate and cooperate with states through compacts or other agreements on matters of mutual concern such as environmental protection and law enforcement.
Source: Bureau of Indian Affairs FAQs
https://www.bia.gov/frequently-asked-questions

Utah Tribal Laws
Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah & Ouray Reservation

§13-4-114. Carrying Loaded Firearm In Vehicle or On Street.
(1) Unless otherwise authorized by law, a person may not carry a loaded firearm:
(a) in or on a vehicle, unless:
(i) the vehicle is in the person's lawful possession; or
(ii) the person is carrying the loaded firearm in a vehicle with the consent of the person lawfully in possession of the vehicle;
(b) on a public street; or
(c) in a posted prohibited area.
(2) Subsection
(1 )(a) does not apply to a minor under 18 years of age, since a minor under 18 years of age may not carry a loaded firearm in or on a vehicle.
(3) Notwithstanding Subsection (1)(a)(i) and (ii), a person may not possess a loaded rifle, shotgun, or muzzle-loading rifle in a vehicle.
(4) A violation of this section is a Class B offense.
[ This law is similar to Utah law 76-10-505. ]

§13-4-115. Carrying Concealed Dangerous Weapon - Penalties.
(1) Except as authorized by law, a person who carries a concealed dangerous weapon, as defined in Section 13-4-112, Including an unloaded firearm on his or her person or one that Is readily accessible for immediate use which is not securely encased, as defined In this part, in or on a place other than the person's residence, property, a vehicle in the person's lawful possession, or a vehicle, with the consent of the individual who is lawfully In possession of the vehicle, or business under the person's control ls guilty of a Class B offense.
(2) A person who carries a concealed dangerous weapon which is a loaded firearm in violation of Subsection (1) is guilty of a Class A offense.
(3) A person who carries concealed an unlawfully possessed short barrel shotgun or a short barrel rifle is guilty of a Class A offense with a sentence enhancement of double the penalties otherwise applicable to a Class A offense up to a maximum of 3 years jail time and/or a $15,000 fine per offense.
(4) If the concealed firearm Is used in the commission of a Class A offense, and the person Is a party to the offense, the person is guilty of a Class A offense with a sentence enhancement of double the penalties otherwise applicable to a Class A offense up to a maximum of 3 years jail time and/or a $15,000 fine per offense.
[ This law is similar to Utah law 76-10-504. ]

§13-4-112. Definitions.
(2) (a) "Concealed dangerous weapon" means a dangerous weapon that is:
(i) covered, hidden, or secreted in a manner that the public would not be aware of its presence; and
(ii) readily accessible for immediate use.
(b) A dangerous weapon is not a concealed dangerous weapon if it is a firearm which is unloaded and is securely encased.
[ This law is similar to Utah law 76-10-501. ]

Additional Information

Utah Divison of Indian Affairs: https://indian.utah.gov/tribal-nations

To obtain contact information for the Federally recognized tribes, proceed to "Tribal Leaders Directory".

The Bureau of Indian Affairs provides contact information for each tribe's Tribal Leader. https://www.bia.gov/

TRIBAL LAW GATEWAY
https://www.narf.org/nill/triballaw/index.html

Link to Court Ruling that Reservation Law only applies to those who live on the Reservation.
http://caselaw.lp.findlaw.com/scripts/getcase.pl?court=US&vol=435&invol=191